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How To Make a Driftwood Wind Chime

If you love the sounds of chimes blowing in the wind. Learn how to make a driftwood wind chime in 5 easy steps.

How To Make a Driftwood Wind Chime

How To Make a Driftwood Wind Chime:

Driftwood is one of those pieces of beauty. Each piece is unique and if you think about how it was created, it’s just amazing. A fallen tree goes from water to sand to drifting around. Since I love walking  around on the beaches and near the rivers I have collected many pieces of driftwood of all different sizes. So I had enough pieces to create a driftwood wind chime.

Supplies for:How To Make a Driftwood Wind Chime

Supplies

  • Driftwood
  • Strong Hemp String
  • Drill( The Dremel is also a great tool to drill a hole)
  • Screw hook
  • 2 small screws
Drill a hole:How To Make a Driftwood Wind Chime

How To Assemble Driftwood Wind Chime:

Step 1: Gather The Driftwood

Gather all the driftwood you have and make sure they are odd shaped pieces of driftwood. They look best when grouping them. Don’t try to organize them. They need to look uneven when you hang it

Step 2: Drill Hole

Take each driftwood piece and drill a hole in the middle. The driftwood is pretty hard so I used a  1/8 inch drill bit and that created a hole big enough to pass the rope through.

Step 3: Stringing the driftwood

 Take a small screw and tie it first before you start threading the rope. It prevents the rope from sliding through the hold. Wet the tip of the rope so it’s easy to pass through the hole. The last piece you need is to tie the second screw at the top and leave at least 5 inches of rope to attach to the screw hook. Use pliers to close the screw hook to avoid the rope from sliding off.

Step 4: Hanging the chime

Screw the hook in the patio ceiling or wherever you are going to hang it.  Now you can hang your driftwood chime and it will make pretty sounds in the wind.

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33 Comments

  1. This is so pretty! My daughter and I are heading to the beach Thursday so you know what I’ll be looking for!! :o]

    Tania

    1. Thanks, I hope you were able to find some drift wood, sometimes there is nothing on the beaches. You can find them in the sand dunes where the accumulate after the tied goes back in.. Thanks Maria

  2. Love your driftwood chime 🙂 I usually pick up larger pieces of driftwood when I’m at the beach – now I’m going to look for smaller pieces so I can make a chime 🙂 Thanks for the inspiration!

    1. I am happy you stopped by.. I hope you find some smaller Driftwood pieces out and about!
      Maria

  3. I love anything Driftwood!!! THis is gorgeous!!! Christine from Little Brags

  4. Maria this is so cute! I’m not a big fan of wind chimes because I don’t like the sound of metal hitting metal but I think this would be so relaxing..definitely going to have to give it a try!

    1. Sydney, thanks for that! you are right this chime has a very light sound.. very soothing.
      Maria

    1. Hi Joy
      Thanks for finding me and leaving such a nice comment, it made me feel loved! This weekend I so far went to see my son play tennis in a tournament and now I am resting and going to do a post! Trying to do it all, its not easy..Have a wonderful weekend
      Maria

  5. Maria, what a great way to use driftwood. It looks awesome, great job and perfect for the summer:).

  6. This is very pretty, thank you for the wonderful tutorial. I do have a question though. Why is it called a wind chime, and not hanging decoration? How does it chime, if there is no parts clacking together? Does it somehow chime in the design it’s in? That would be amazing!! I love driftwood and wind chimes.

    Thank you again I wish I lived near a beach, or lake. Time for a short trip whoop 🙌

    1. It has a sound, its hard to explain but its a deep chime made with the sounds of lots of drift wood hitting against each other in the wind. Thanks for visiting.

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